Claude Monet: Under the Poplars, 1887, private collection, Scan: RECOM ART

Exhibitions 2017 | our bucket list

In a few days a new year will begin. But what’s going on in 2017? A lot of museums present their upcoming exhibitions. Let’s have a look! Michelle and I have already chosen our individual TOP 3 we would like to see this upcoming year.

WERA’S TOP 3

PETER LINDBERGH / GARRY WINOGRAND WOMEN ON STREET

Garry Winogrand, who died in 1984, ranks among the most important exponents of street photography and, from the mid-1970s, he played a decisive role in establishing photography in the context of contemporary art. His frequently falling lines, a direct and intuitive approach to his subject and an insightful view of the cosmos of the street are the features of his distinctive style. In addition to the 85 black-and-white images of the Women are Beautiful series, which will be on show in its entirety in Germany for the first time, the exhibition will also showcase, as a world premiere, the rare colour photographs from the period 1958 to 1964. Peter Lindbergh is regarded as one of the best living photographers and a star of fashion photography. In the 1990s, with his photographs of Naomi Campbell, Linda Evangelista, Tatjana Patitz and Cindy Crawford he coined the term supermodel. And yet, over and over again, he has demonstrated something untypical for the fashion world, as the focus of his attention is the individual behind the model. In his photographs he turns against the ideal of beauty prescribed by the fashion world and he often shows a beauty that has been attained “through experiences, through heartbreaks, through having children”, as Cindy Crawford told ICON, a German lifestyle magazine, in 2015. The exhibition includes 44 photographs that were taken at fashion shoots on the street and, for the most part, are being shown for the first time at the NRW-Forum Düsseldorf.

NRW-Forum Düsseldorf
PETER LINDBERGH / GARRY WINOGRAND WOMEN ON STREET
February 3 – April 30, 2017

© The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco
© The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco

Costume Institute’s Spring 2017 Exhibition at The Met to Focus on Rei Kawakubo and the Art of the In-Between

The exhibition will feature approximately 120 examples of Kawakubo’s womenswear designs for Comme des Garçons, dating from her first Paris runway show in 1981 to her most recent collection. Organized thematically rather than chronologically, the examples will examine Kawakubo’s revolutionary experiments in interstitiality or “in-betweenness”—the space between boundaries. By situating her designs within and between dualities such as East/West, male/female, and past/present, Kawakubo not only challenges the rigidity and artificiality of such binaries, but also resolves and dissolves them. To reflect this, mannequins will be arranged at eye level with no physical barriers, thereby dissolving the usual distance between objects on display and museum visitors.

Presented in the Museum’s Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Exhibition Hall on the second floor, the exhibition will examine Kawakubo’s fascination with interstitiality, or the space between boundaries. Existing within and between entities—self/other, object/subject, fashion/anti-fashion—Kawakubo’s work challenges conventional notions of beauty, good taste, and, ultimately, fashionability. Not a traditional retrospective, the thematic exhibition will be The Costume Institute’s first monographic show on a living designer since the Yves Saint Laurent exhibition in 1983.

“In blurring the art/fashion divide, Kawakubo asks us to think differently about clothing,” said Thomas P. Campbell, Director and CEO of The Met. “Curator Andrew Bolton will explore work that often looks like sculpture in an exhibition that will challenge our ideas about fashion’s role in contemporary culture.”

In celebration of the opening, The Met’s Costume Institute Benefit, also known as The Met Gala, will take place on Monday, May 1, 2017. The evening’s co-chairs will be Katy Perry, Pharrell Williams, and Anna Wintour. Rei Kawakubo will serve as Honorary Chair. The event is The Costume Institute’s main source of annual funding for exhibitions, publications, acquisitions, and capital improvements.

THE MET
Rei Kawakubo and the Art of the In-Between
May 4 – September 4, 2017

Rei Kawakubo (Japanese, born 1942) for Comme des Garçons (Japanese, founded 1969), “Body Meets Dress - Dress Meets Body,” spring/summer 1997 Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, © Paolo Roversi
Rei Kawakubo (Japanese, born 1942) for
Comme des Garçons (Japanese, founded 1969),
“Body Meets Dress – Dress Meets Body,”
spring/summer 1997
Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art,
© Paolo Roversi

Impressionism: The Art of Landscape

River and marine landscapes, fields and gardens in bloom, reflections on water, and winter landscapes were themes used by the impressionists to carry out their experiments. With works by artists such as Claude Monet (1840–1926), Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841–1919), and Gustave Caillebotte (1848–1894) the show brings major representatives of impressionism to Potsdam, presenting artistic explorations into what at the time was a new, modern understanding of nature.

Precise observations of nature not only gained in importance in the natural sciences during the nineteenth century—the impressionists also reacted to this trend by painting outdoors and recording ever-changing light and weather phenomena. Their landscape motifs were no longer charged with historical or symbolic significance. Rather, impressionist artists focused on capturing the present.

This exhibition presents various themes in Impressionist landscape painting, which made it the first distinctly modern movement in painting. They emancipated themselves from earlier generations in their depictions of the sea and forest tracks. In garden paintings, they began to use color freely. Winter landscapes became a place to experiment with the color white. In landscapes of the south they wove together light and air to create shimmering visual effects. In river landscapes they explored reflective surfaces. To this day, the very act of seeing continues to make viewers an integral part of their works.

Museum Barberini
Impressionism: The Art of Landscape
January 23 – May 28, 2017

Claude Monet: Under the Poplars, 1887, private collection, Scan: RECOM ART
Claude Monet: Under the Poplars, 1887, private collection, Scan: RECOM ART

Michelle’S TOP 3

PIETER HUGO: BETWEEN THE DEVIL AND THE DEEP BLUE SEA

What divides us and what unites us? How do people of all colors live with the shadows of cultural repression or political dominance? The South African photographer Pieter Hugo (* 1976 in Johannes¬burg) explores these questions in his portraits, still lifes, and landscapes.

In 2017, the Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg will be the first museum in Germany to present a comprehensive overview of the series with which Pieter Hugo achieved international recognition.

Raised in post-colonial South Africa, where he witnessed the official end of Apartheid in 1994, Hugo has a keen sense for social dissonances. He perceptively makes his way through all social classes with his camera, and not only in his native country but also in places like Rwanda, Nigeria, Ghana, and China. How do people of all age groups and from the most diverse origins deal with their historical baggage and living conditions? Pieter Hugo’s photographs record the visible and hidden traces and scars of lived biographies and experienced national history. He is particularly interested in societal subcultures, the gulf between the ideal and reality. His pictures feature the homeless; albinos; AIDS sufferers; men who tame hyenas, snakes, and monkeys; people who gather electrical scrap metal in apocalyptic scenarios; costumed Nollywood actors in striking poses, in addition to his own family and friends.

His photographs are non-hierarchical; everyone is treated with the same amount of respect. More artist than anthropologist or documentarian, Hugo captures the “moment of voluntary vulnerability” (Pieter Hugo) with a pronouncedly detached, but at the same time also empathetic, concise visual language, creating in this way true to life portraits of powerful directness. In many cases, this humanity stands in sharp contrast to the hardships of the social reality engulfing the subjects of his pictures. Entirely in this sense, Pieter Hugo’s photographic still lifes and landscapes occasionally seem like social commentaries or metaphors, complementing his socio-cultural portraits.

Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg

Pieter Hugo: Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea

February 19 – July 23, 2017

ABDULLAHI MOHAMMED WITH MAINASARA, LAGOS, NIGERIA, FROM THE SERIES ‘GADADWAN KURA’ - THE HYENA MEN SERIES II, 2005-2007, 2007 c-print © Pieter Hugo, Priska Pasquer, Cologne
ABDULLAHI MOHAMMED WITH MAINASARA, LAGOS, NIGERIA, FROM THE SERIES ‘GADADWAN KURA’ – THE HYENA MEN SERIES II, 2005-2007, 2007 c-print
© Pieter Hugo, Priska Pasquer, Cologne

Skulptur Projekte 2017

The Skulptur Projekte were initiated in 1977 by Klaus Bußmann, at the time the custodian and later the director of the Westfälisches Landesmuseum, and Kasper König, who since that time has held the position of chief curator for every edition of the exhibition in teams of changing constellations. The generous rhythm of the show’s realization – at ten-year intervals – distinguishes the Skulptur Projekte clearly from other major international exhibitions.

Regardless of the fact that many of the works remain in the city, the exhibitions themselves are always temporary in nature. In the exhibition title, both the word Skulptur and the word Projekte have thus retained their legitimacy to this day.

Well, it’s just one of the art events you have to see next year!

Skulptur Projekte Münster

June 10 – October 1, 2017

Ilya Kabakow, Blickst du hinauf und liest die Worte (1997) | Photo: Florian Adler, CC BY-SA 3.0
Ilya Kabakow, Blickst du hinauf und liest die Worte (1997) | Photo: Florian Adler, CC BY-SA 3.0

PEACE

How does peace actually work?

Doves, rainbow colors, and rifles adorned with flowers—depic­tions of peace are usually limited to stan­dard clichés and familiar symbols. In a discur­sive group exhi­bi­tion, the Schirn Kunsthalle Frank­furt pursues a different approach and addresses the ques­tion of how peace actu­ally works. Proceeding from the premise that peace is reflected most clearly in processes of inter­ac­tion and commu­ni­ca­tion among people and among all of the players in the ecosystem, the exhi­bi­tion focuses on phenomena that have always contributed to making human (co-)exis­tence possible and sustain­able, such as water, animals, language, or the culture of giving. A large number of works by inter­na­tional artists, among them Jan de Cock, Isabel Lewis, Terence Koh, Surasi Kusol­wong, Lee Mingwei, Katja Novit­skova, Timur Sin-Qin, and Agnieszka Polska, offer a new, contem­po­rary perspec­tive on the subject of peace. The current reassess­ment of the Humanist view of the world and influ­ence on the rela­tion­ships between humankind and nature will play an impor­tant role in the presen­ta­tion.

Schirn Frankfurt

PEACE

June 30 – September 24, 2017

 

 

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